Monday, May 16, 2016

HWA's Meetings with Israeli Officials

Let us take a look at HWA's interaction with Israeli officials. In order to learn more about this topic let us take a look at what HWA said in his co-worker letters [PDF]. These letters have been compiled into a 2715 page PDF file. When quoting HWA the page number refers to that PDF file.

What HWA Said in the Co-Worker Letters

Let us take a look at what HWA said of these officials in his co-worker letters.

Topics discussed in these passages include:
  • Sponsoring archaeological excavations.
  • Funding the International Cultural Center for Youth in Jerusalem. According to HWA it was almost wholly funded by Ambassador College and AICF for about ten years (about 1968-1978). (December 27, 1978, p. 2341.)
  • Improving the State of Israel's relations with Japan and Kenya as noted in the passage discussing Yitzak Rabin. (At least that is what HWA claimed Rabin said to him. I advise caution with believing that claim.)
HWA in at least one point insinuates that relations between the State of Israel and Arab states that HWA had visited have become more friendly after he started visiting them. One should be quite skeptical of any such claim of that sort by HWA. Any influence HWA had regarding negotiations between the State of Israel and the neighboring Arab states appear to be practically non-existent.

At one point HWA denigrates the condition of East Jerusalem that had been left in by the Palestinian people who lived there before the 1967 Six Day War revealing his personal bias against the Palestinians. (August 19, 1976, pp. 2220-1.)

If he ever met David Ben-Gurion or Abba Eban as had hoped HWA never mentioned those meetings in his Co-Worker Letters. (February 28, 1972, p. 1851.)

At one point HWA boasts that Moshe Dayan was a friend of his for ten years. (December 27, 1978, p. 2341.) But that is the only time he is ever mentioned in HWA's co-worker letters.

Stanley Rader is mentioned as accompanying HWA.

HWA's Co-Worker Letters

In 2011 PCG released a booklet apparently written by Joel Hilliker entitled A Warm Friend of Israel recounting HWA's relations with Israeli government officials in order to proclaim PCG to be the sole legitimate continuation of HWA's activities and to delegitimze all the other COG groups. PCG's booklet boasts of HWA meeting with the following prominent Israeli politicians. 
The first official to welcome Mr. Armstrong into “a partnership with Israel” was a signer of the 1948 Declaration of Independence, Tourism Minister Moshe Kol. From that initial partnership at the Knesset in 1968 to his death in 1986, Mr. Armstrong met with President Zalman Shazar, Prime Minister Golda Meir, President Ephraim Katzir, Prime Minister Yitzak Rabin, Prime Minister Menachem Begin, President Yitzhak Navon, President Chaim Herzog and Prime Minister Shimon Peres. (PCG, A Warm Friend of Israel, 2011, p. 5.)
HWA's discussion of the Israeli politicians mentioned above now begins.

Moshe Kol

(Israeli Minister of Tourism 1966-77 and Israeli Minister of Transportation 1966-9.)
It was a most memorable luncheon. The favor we were given in their eyes -- the warmth of their attitude toward us -- was inspiring, astonishing, and most unusual. The Israeli Minister of Tourism and Development, Mr. Moshe Kol, proposed that we build an iron bridge that could never be broken between Ambassador College and Hebrew University. After 2 1/2 years that "iron bridge" has been greatly strengthened. (May 28, 1971, p. 1806.)

Saturday night, in the ballroom of the Hilton, we had a dinner with about 45 present. At the center table were Ministers of the Cabinet -- Moshe Kol, and Gideon Hausner and wife. General Yigail Yadin, organizer of the Israeli Army in 1948, former Chief of Staff, noted archaeologist, scholar and author; Professor Mazar, Mr. and Mrs. Rader and myself. Many other top priority people in government and education were present. It was a renewing of friendships that now have lasted and grown deeper for eight years. (August 19, 1976, p. 2222.)

And through the AICF we are supporting the ICCY (International Cultural Center for Youth) directed by Minister of Tourism Moshe Kol -- bringing about a new and friendly relationship between Israeli and Arab youth, especially in Jerusalem. (August 19, 1976, p. 2223.)

There was a special program for me and our party at the ICCY (International Cultural Center for Youth), founded by Eleanor Roosevelt and by Moshe Kol, for years a member of the Knesset and Minister of Tourism for the nation. The program consisted of special dances by both male and female Israeli and Arab youth. The ICCY has been almost wholly supported in the past ten years by Ambassador College and the AICF, and is doing a good work in bringing about an active friendship between Arab and Israeli youth. (December 27, 1978, p. 2341.)

Israeli Prime Ministers

Golda Meir
 
(Prime Minister of Israel, 1969-74.)
In Jerusalem I had a long talk with Mrs. Golda Meir, the Prime Minister. She explained the high tensions between Israel and the Arab nations merely in an armistice. Actually the '67 war has not yet been settled. Jerusalem, as I have told you before, will be the number one news source in the world from now on. (February 27, 1971, p. 1785.)

In the June number of The PLAIN TRUTH -- and I HOPE we'll be able to print and send out such a vast number of copies -- I'll give you my report on my conference with Mrs. Golda Meir, Prime Minister of Israel, and also of Mrs. Indira Gandhi, Prime Minister of India. I will give you my own close - up personal portrait evaluation of those two outstanding women -- sitting in seats of TREMENDOUS POWER in a very sick, war - inflamed world! (April 12, 1971, p. 1800.)

On learning that we had just come from meetings with the King, and with the Crown Prince the evening before -- following meetings with President Giri of India, and Prime Minister Golda Meir of Israel -- and on the previous trip with Prime Minister Indira Gandhi of India -- at which time King Leopold was traveling with us -- and that two days later we were to have a private meeting with the King of Thailand (Siam) -- this government official looked puzzled, and asked, "Well how in the world do you do it? We've been trying for six months to arrange meetings with some of these people, and yet we haven't been able." And they had the power and prestige of the U.S. government! (May 28, 1971, p. 1808.)

I suppose most people could never realize how nearly IMPOSSIBLE it is to have a half - hour, a forty - five - minute or a l 1/2 - hour personal meeting -- as I have had with President Ferdinand Marcos of the Philippines and Mrs. Gandhi of India, and with Prime Minister Sato and Crown Prince Akihito of Japan, and with the King of Thailand, and Prime Minister Golda Meir of Israel -- and OTHERS -- for example. (May 28, 1971, p. 1809.)

A meeting is also planned with the President of South Korea at the same time, and also meetings with the King of Thailand at Bangkok, with President Giri, and Prime Minister Indira Gandhi of India at New Delhi, then meetings with several leaders of Israel at Jerusalem -- possibly another meeting with Mrs. Golda Meir, and one with former Prime Minister Ben - Gurion -- and I believe a meeting has been arranged with the Foreign Minister, Mr. Abba Eban. Finally a meeting with the President of Romania on the way back to our campus in England, and then returning to Pasadena. (February 28, 1972, p. 1851.)

I overlooked mentioning that, on meeting the Prime Minister of Ceylon, I have now had meetings of some length with all three of the women Prime Ministers in the world -- the other two being Mrs. Indira Gandhi, and Mrs. Golda Meir of Israel (whom, by the way, I may see again this week). (March 26, 1972, p. 1858.)

In Israel we have meetings scheduled with Abba Eban, the Foreign Minister -- possibly another meeting with Mrs. Meir, besides many others. Then we have a meeting scheduled with the President of Romania, en route to our campus in England, and after a few days there, back to Pasadena Headquarters. (March 26, 1972, p. 1860.)

When I spoke of a meeting with Mrs. Golda Meir, the late prime minister of Israel, a picture of me talking with her was flashed on the screen. (February 8, 1981, p. 2503.)
Yitzak Rabin

(Prime Minister of Israel, 1974-7, 1992-5.)

Intriguingly in this section it is stated that HWA helped to improve the State of Israel's relations with Japan and Kenya.
But Monday was our BIG DAY -- our meeting with Prime Minister Yitzak Rabin. Usually it is contrary to protocol in many countries to see both the President and the Prime Minister on the same visit. This time I did not see President Katzir, but I had already had two or three fine personal meetings with him, and he sent to me his personal regards and best wishes on this visit.

My appointment with the Prime Minister was at noon Monday. Ambassador Ravid (also formerly Ambassador to Guinea) went along with us. As you know, I am nearly always accompanied on such visits with Mr. Stanley R. Rader, our chief legal counsel, and now also Vice President for Financial Affairs, and Executive Vice President of the Ambassador International Cultural Foundation (AICF). This time Mrs. Rader also accompanied us.

Mr. Rabin is not noted for a big wide vote - getting political smile like Jimmy Carter (usually he is a very solemn man) and being the chief executive handling all the troubles of a modern Israel -- he has reason to be serious. But he met me and our party with a warm and cordial smile.

"Mr. Prime Minister," I said, "I'm sorry it's been such a long time before I've had an opportunity to meet you, but it is indeed a pleasure and an honor."

"Well, Mr. Armstrong," he smiled in return, "it's just happened that I've been in your country or Europe or some other place every time you've been here since I became Prime Minister. But of course I know a great deal about you, and we all do deeply appreciate your interest in Israel."

The entire meeting, lasting perhaps 45 minutes, was warm and friendly. We spoke about the two jet planes that have more or less "commuted" between Jerusalem and Cairo, and he was candid in telling us of Secretary Kissinger's peace accomplishments. He was very appreciative of my efforts toward WORLD PEACE, and especially in bringing nations like Japan and Israel closer together -- also Kenya and Israel; and my friendships with Arab chiefs - of - state; and efforts toward a better approach to harmony and understanding between them and Israel. Actually there has been a slight lessening of tensions between some of my Arab friends -- heads of governments -- and Israel. And through the AICF we are supporting the ICCY (International Cultural Center for Youth) directed by Minister of Tourism Moshe Kol -- bringing about a new and friendly relationship between Israeli and Arab youth, especially in Jerusalem.

Somehow, returning to Jerusalem seems like returning home -- and it may be my home for a thousand years, beginning VERY SOON, NOW! (August 19, 1976, pp. 2222-3.)
Menachem Begin

(Prime Minister of Israel, 1977-83.)
I had meetings with President Navon, with Prime Minister Begin, Yigael Yadin (leader of the Democratic Movement for Change Party), Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan, Speaker of the Knesset (a friend of ten years standing), Shimon Peres (leader of the leading Labor Party), Mayor Teddy Kollek, Knesset member Gideon Hausner (who prosecuted the German Eichmann as Attorney General for Israel,) Professor Benjamin Mazar, who directed our great archaeological project adjoining the south wall of the Temple, Dr. Joseph Aviram of the Hebrew University, and many others. (December 27, 1978, p. 2341.)

And I forgot to tell you that after speaking with Prime Minister Begin in the Knesset last week, I am scheduled for a meeting with President Sadat in Cairo (or, perhaps in Aswan), in February, and another visit to Tokyo in April. I am happy to be back in harness once again. (December 27, 1978, p. 2343.)

I shall fly on overseas for visits with President Sadat of Egypt and Prime Minister Begin at Jerusalem -- provided they are not then meeting with President Carter at Camp David. It was announced last night that the President has invited them both, and they have accepted. (March 21, 1980, p. 2446.)

Then on to Jerusalem again where I have another meeting with Prime Minister Menachem Begin, besides many other meetings with officials in government and universities. I hope to inspect again the major archaeological project we are participating in immediately south of the Temple wall extending to the adjacent City of David. (October 23, 1980, p. 2479.)

By the way, it may interest you to know I am writing from Jerusalem, November 3. The United States presidential election is tomorrow. Today I had a good long talk with Prime Minister Menachem Begin at his office, accompanied by Mr. Stanley Rader as usual, and also with the mayor of Jerusalem Teddy Kollek and with our dear friend and former Israel consul general of Los Angeles, Michael Ravid. The prime minister left an important meeting in Tel Aviv, taking the one - hour drive to Jerusalem for our private meeting and then back to finish the meeting at Tel Aviv. When I mentioned how considerate it was of him to make this special effort to see me, he said he would rise up in the middle of the night to see me. Our meeting ended in an affectionate bear hug. He was very gracious and considerate. He gave me a special overview statement on the Middle East situation for our PLAIN TRUTH readers. I have decided to give him and President Anwar el-Sadat of Egypt together a big cover story in The PLAIN TRUTH, either the January or February number. I am to have a private meeting with President Sadat next Sunday or Monday. Our photographers are along, and you will see pictures of these important Middle East meetings. These heads of governments know I am doing what I can, as God leads, in bringing PEACE between nations -- although real peace will have to be brought at last by the living Jesus Christ, returning to earth in all the supreme POWER and GLORY of the Great GOD! He will come to this city -- and, thankfully, soon! (November 3, 1980, pp. 2483-4.)

On Monday, November 3 (the day before the U.S. presidential election), I had another very splendid meeting with Prime Minister Menachem Begin. I was of course accompanied by Mr. Rader and also present was Mayor Teddy Kollek. The prime minister had interrupted a government meeting in Tel Aviv, to come with a one - hour automobile drive to Jerusalem for our meeting. The Tel Aviv meeting recessed for 2 - 1/2 hours until Mr. Begin could return. When I apologized for this interruption and his two - hour round trip drive for our meeting, he said, "Mr. Armstrong, I would get up at 2 o'clock in the morning, if necessary, to see you." I told the prime minister we were planning to publish a cover story about him and President Sadat of Egypt in The PLAIN TRUTH, and he smilingly approved. The meeting ended in a bear hug. Our meeting with President Sadat in Cairo had to be postponed, because President Yitzhak Navon of Israel was in Cairo on a state visit while we were there, and we were planning a full televised private meeting with him. Our own TV crew had been flown over there, and the meeting with Mr. Begin was photographed and will be shown later on television. (November 26, 1980, pp. 2485-6.)

Today, as a new President is inaugurated in Washington, also comes the news that my dear friend, Menachem Begin, Prime Minister of Israel, is being almost thrust out of office -- his government about to fall. There was to be a reelection in Israel in November, when Mr. Begin probably planned to retire anyway, because of serious heart trouble. But he has held his government in power only by the narrowest margin for the past several days, and now he has announced a new election in July instead of November. The last time I saw him, hardly two months ago, we parted with a bear hug. However, whoever is elected next prime minister is in all likelihood the man I also know well, and we still have many friends at and near the top in Israel. (January 20, 1981, p. 2500.)
Shimon Peres

(Prime Minister of Israel, 1977, 1984-6, 1995-6. President of Israel, 2007-14.)
I had meetings with President Navon, with Prime Minister Begin, Yigael Yadin (leader of the Democratic Movement for Change Party), Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan, Speaker of the Knesset (a friend of ten years standing), Shimon Peres (leader of the leading Labor Party), Mayor Teddy Kollek, Knesset member Gideon Hausner (who prosecuted the German Eichmann as Attorney General for Israel,) Professor Benjamin Mazar, who directed our great archaeological project adjoining the south wall of the Temple, Dr. Joseph Aviram of the Hebrew University, and many others. (December 27, 1978, p. 2341.)
In Jerusalem, I had a personal meeting with Prime Minister Shimon Peres. He had a meeting a couple days before with Secretary Shultz. I asked him how he viewed the Middle East question as of the moment. He replied, "I am very hopeful we may have a break - through soon." (May 16, 1985, p. 2685.)
Israeli Presidents

Zalman Shazar

(President of Israel, 1963-73.)
December: Joint participation with Hebrew University in archaeological project completed in palace - residence of Israel President Zalman Shazar. (January 7, 1969, p. 1628.)

And on December l, at the official residence of Israel's President, Zalman Shazar, we made the joint participation official. (May 28, 1971, p. 1807.)

In many ways I have had a deep personal interest in Jerusalem since December 1, 1968. On that date, in a formal ceremony at the palace of the late President Shazar, Ambassador College entered into this joint participation formally with Hebrew University and the Israel Archeological Society. (August 19, 1976, pp. 2219-20.)
Ephraim Katzir

(President of Israel, 1973-8.)
This time I did not see President Katzir, but I had already had two or three fine personal meetings with him, and he sent to me his personal regards and best wishes on this visit. (August 19, 1976, p. 2223.)
Yitzak Navon

(President of Israel, 1978-83.)
I had meetings with President Navon, with Prime Minister Begin, Yigael Yadin (leader of the Democratic Movement for Change Party), Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan, Speaker of the Knesset (a friend of ten years standing), Shimon Peres (leader of the leading Labor Party), Mayor Teddy Kollek, Knesset member Gideon Hausner (who prosecuted the German Eichmann as Attorney General for Israel,) Professor Benjamin Mazar, who directed our great archaeological project adjoining the south wall of the Temple, Dr. Joseph Aviram of the Hebrew University, and many others. (December 27, 1978, p. 2341.)

Our meeting with President Sadat in Cairo had to be postponed, because President Yitzhak Navon of Israel was in Cairo on a state visit while we were there, and we were planning a full televised private meeting with him. Our own TV crew had been flown over there, and the meeting with Mr. Begin was photographed and will be shown later on television. (November 26, 1980, p. 2486.)

A week ago yesterday, Thursday, November 19, I had a personal meeting with President Yitzhak Navon of Israel in Jerusalem, and the night before I was guest of honor at a banquet hosted by Mayor Teddy Kollek of Jerusalem. Present also were former Mayor John Lindsay of New York City, and Jacob Rothschild of London. (November 27, 1981, p. 2539.)
Chaim Herzog (President of Israel, 1983-93) is left unmentioned in HWA's Co-Worker Letters. However HWA did meet him on June 26, 1984 as is noted on page 1 of the July 16, 1984 issue of Worldwide News.

***

Teddy Kollek

(Mayor of Jerusalem, 1965-93.)
Still another very important development here: I am here also to consult further with Mayor Kollek of Jerusalem. He was our guest at Ambassador College in Pasadena only eleven days ago. And also with officials of the government's Ministry of Education, concerning the distribution of our booklets here in Israel. (April 12, 1971, p. 1798.)

We arrived Thursday -- late afternoon. Friday morning, Mayor Teddy Kollek met us at the Jerusalem Hilton Hotel at ten. He took us on a 2 1/2 hour tour of portions of the "old city" where the Mayor has been supervising rejuvenation and rebuilding. After all the years of being "trodden down by the Gentiles" the old walled city has become dirty, decayed -- anything but beautiful. But Mayor Kollek is RESTORING much of its original beauty.

Israel is a very poor country -- economically. The government does not have billions upon billions of dollars for such purposes. Much of this restoration is being done by volunteer labor. It made me think of the early days in building Ambassador College. ...

First the Mayor took us through the citadel -- or the "Tower of David." This is an agglomeration of old buildings, inside the northwest corner of the walled city. Some of these old brick and stone buildings date back to the second century B.C. The northern tower of the citadel has been known as the Tower of David since Byzantine times -- but neither the citadel nor Tower of David have any connection with the ancient King David.

There are many walls and many rooms, and it is being restored into beautiful and modern condition.

From the citadel we were taken over to the old Jewish quarter of the old walled city. Here are a cluster of low, domed houses. Very old. Very unimpressive from the outside. But entering, we were struck by the BEAUTY, the MAJESTY of the rooms -- the high ceilings which had looked like very low buildings from the dingy old outside. But Mayor Kollek had done a remarkable job of restoring this area. There were about four synagogues -- each in a different room in the same building -- now very modern, very bright and beautiful on the interiors.

I was really impressed with all the plans Mayor Kollek told us he has in mind for renewing and re - beautifying the city of Jerusalem. ...

Mayor Kollek then took the group of us to a special restaurant for lunch. There, several other friends joined us. (August 19, 1976, pp. 2220-1.)

On July 4th there will be a big "4th of July Celebration" in Jerusalem, hosted jointly by the Mayor of Jerusalem, Mr. Teddy Kollek, and myself. The city of Philadelphia had an exact duplicate made of the Liberty Bell -- crack and all -- and gave it to the city of Jerusalem. In the spring of 1976 -- Passover time -- the mayor came to me privately, and asked my help in building an important downtown park in Jerusalem, to be named the "LIBERTY BELL PARK." Through the AICF, I was able to agree to supply the children's playground area, at the very opening of the park. The park is now completed, and Mayor Kollek has asked me to be present on July 4th for the opening and dedication of the Liberty Bell Park. (May 21, 1978, p. 2275.)

I had meetings with President Navon, with Prime Minister Begin, Yigael Yadin (leader of the Democratic Movement for Change Party), Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan, Speaker of the Knesset (a friend of ten years standing), Shimon Peres (leader of the leading Labor Party), Mayor Teddy Kollek, Knesset member Gideon Hausner (who prosecuted the German Eichmann as Attorney General for Israel,) Professor Benjamin Mazar, who directed our great archaeological project adjoining the south wall of the Temple, Dr. Joseph Aviram of the Hebrew University, and many others.

Mayor Kollek had arranged a special inauguration of the new downtown city park in my honor, with a formal ceremony, a band, and speeches. Over the park was flying the stars and stripes, alongside the Israeli flag, and at the entrance on a special stone sculpture work, a plaque had my name engraved in it (since I had sponsored the Children's Playground area at the entrance of the park). This was done through the AICF (Ambassador International Cultural Foundation). The park is called the "Liberty Bell Park," and inside the entrance is an exact replica of the Liberty Bell -- a gift of the city of Philadelphia to the city of Jerusalem. So it's like a bit of America in the very ancient and historic city of Jerusalem. (August 14, 1978, p. 2314.)

Today I had a good long talk with Prime Minister Menachem Begin at his office, accompanied by Mr. Stanley Rader as usual, and also with the mayor of Jerusalem Teddy Kollek and with our dear friend and former Israel consul general of Los Angeles, Michael Ravid. (November 3, 1980, pp. 2484-5.)

In Jerusalem with Mr. Rader we renewed many close friendships with Israeli leaders. I spoke at a banquet hosted by Mayor Teddy Kollek. We attended a Sunday afternoon entertainment by the Arab section of the ICCY (International Cultural Center for Youth) in the "old city" Arab section of the city. It was a performance by both Arab and Israeli youth, with a very hilarious "belly dance" by a little 9-year-old Arab girl. This youth center is succeeding well in bringing together the youths, of both Arab and Jewish children and young people, in harmonious peace instead of hostility. We've been participating in this foundation for 12 years. A whole square in front of the main headquarters building in the newer area of Jerusalem is named "The Herbert W. Armstrong Square." (November 26, 1980, p. 2485.)

On Monday, November 3 (the day before the U.S. presidential election), I had another very splendid meeting with Prime Minister Menachem Begin. I was of course accompanied by Mr. Rader and also present was Mayor Teddy Kollek. (November 26, 1980, p. 2486.)

A week ago yesterday, Thursday, November 19, I had a personal meeting with President Yitzhak Navon of Israel in Jerusalem, and the night before I was guest of honor at a banquet hosted by Mayor Teddy Kollek of Jerusalem. Present also were former Mayor John Lindsay of New York City, and Jacob Rothschild of London. (November 27, 1981, p. 2539.)

Mayor Teddy Kollek hosted a luncheon for me and visited with Aaron Dean and me in our hotel suite. (May 16, 1985, p. 2685.)
Benjamin Mazar

(Head of Hebrew University. Archaeologist.)
Hebrew University is recognized as the top center of scholarship in the Middle East. It is a large university of 12,000 students. Like Ambassador College, its students are serious, studying with purpose. Like Ambassador, there are no hippies, and no student rebellion, or student riots. The fact that they are Jewish and we are not makes no difference (we do have a few Jewish students at Ambassador). This great archaeological project is under the direct supervision of Dr. Benjamin Mazar, one of the world's recognized outstanding experts on archaeology, former President of Hebrew University. (December 10, 1968, p. 1621.)

Some ten days later, Dr. Benjamin Mazar, former President of Hebrew University and now director of archaeological dig, with Dr. Josef Aviram, visited both Texas and Pasadena campuses of Ambassador College, addressing students. (January 7, 1969, p. 1628.)

In Tokyo we met Dr. Binyamin Mazar, Director of our big archaeological exploration in Jerusalem, and also Professor Werblowsky, of Hebrew University of Jerusalem, who is professor of Comparative Religions. (October 28, 1970, p. 1761.)

The professors invited were those whose principal area of interest is the Middle East. All were greatly interested in archaeology. After I spoke, Dr. Mazar showed them many slides of our archaeological project. (October 28, 1970, p. 1761.)

Dr. Hoeh happened to be acquainted with Dr. Benjamin Mazar, archaeologist, and former President of Hebrew University. He found Dr. Mazar at the time in charge of the most important "dig" so far undertaken, starting from the south wall of the Temple Mount. Three major United States universities had sought participation in this outstanding project. All had been rejected. But Professor Mazar offered a 50 - 50 joint participation to Ambassador College!
This was a far more important project than Drs. Hoeh and Martin had envisioned. They were elated, and telexed me the news, requesting that I fly to Jerusalem to inspect this opportunity. I didn't share their enthusiasm, and was unable to go to Jerusalem at the time.

However, about mid - October (1968) I did fly to Jerusalem to look over this project. The "dig" had been begun a few months before. I met Prof. Mazar and inspected the project.

It was much more impressive than I had expected.

I began to realize the scientific and educational value to Ambassador College. A luncheon was held in a private dining room in the Knesset -- the government's capitol building. Present at the luncheon were five high - ranking officials of both the university and the government. And also, with me, were Dr. Hoeh, Mr. Charles F. Hunting, one of Ambassador's Vice Presidents in charge of finances for Britain, Europe and the Middle East, and Mr. Stanley R. Rader, our chief counsel.

It was a most memorable luncheon. The favor we were given in their eyes -- the warmth of their attitude toward us -- was inspiring, astonishing, and most unusual. The Israeli Minister of Tourism and Development, Mr. Moshe Kol, proposed that we build an iron bridge that could never be broken between Ambassador College and Hebrew University. After 2 1/2 years that "iron bridge" has been greatly strengthened.

I did not make final decision, however, at that time. We agreed to meet again in Jerusalem on December 1st, for final decision. Meanwhile, Dr. Mazar, with Dr. Aviram, Dean of the College of Humanities at the university, came to Pasadena, and visited also the Texas campus, to look us over. They liked what they saw. And on December l, at the official residence of Israel's President, Zalman Shazar, we made the joint participation official. (May 28, 1971, pp. 1806-7.)

In November, 1968, when both Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Ambassador College were considering the joint participation in the huge archaeological project, Dr. Benjamin Mazar, former President of the University, and Dr. Joseph Aviram, Dean of the College of Humanities at the University, visited the Pasadena and Texas campuses. They were much impressed with what they saw. Several others from Hebrew University and the Israeli government have since visited various ones of our campuses. Ambassador College is highly respected and honored in Israel. (June 28, 1971, p. 1814.)

NINETY Ambassador College students worked on our archaeological project adjoining the Temple Mount in Jerusalem this summer. At a banquet in my honor, hosted by the Hebrew University, with our students present, Professor Mazar presented me with three highly prized artifacts which our students dug up, of the era of Kings David and Solomon, 3,000 years ago -- a decanter and two oil lamps. (August 29, 1972, p. 1896.)

Then at a dinner in Tel Aviv the other night, Professor Mazar, former President of Hebrew University, and now director of our archaeological project at the Temple Mount in Jerusalem (including several hundred of our students who worked there under him for the past five years) also promised to attend our next graduation in Pasadena. So, once again, we will have important educational officials from both Japan and Jerusalem, come to Pasadena. (September 19, 1974, p. 2121.)

Saturday night, in the ballroom of the Hilton, we had a dinner with about 45 present. At the center table were Ministers of the Cabinet -- Moshe Kol, and Gideon Hausner and wife. General Yigail Yadin, organizer of the Israeli Army in 1948, former Chief of Staff, noted archaeologist, scholar and author; Professor Mazar, Mr. and Mrs. Rader and myself. Many other top priority people in government and education were present. It was a renewing of friendships that now have lasted and grown deeper for eight years. Sunday afternoon we went over to Professor Mazar's home, and many other top Israelis dropped in while we were there. Professor Mazar is Director of our big dig and a former President of Hebrew University. (August 19, 1976, p. 2222.)

I had meetings with President Navon, with Prime Minister Begin, Yigael Yadin (leader of the Democratic Movement for Change Party), Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan, Speaker of the Knesset (a friend of ten years standing), Shimon Peres (leader of the leading Labor Party), Mayor Teddy Kollek, Knesset member Gideon Hausner (who prosecuted the German Eichmann as Attorney General for Israel,) Professor Benjamin Mazar, who directed our great archaeological project adjoining the south wall of the Temple, Dr. Joseph Aviram of the Hebrew University, and many others. (December 27, 1978, p. 2341.)
Other Quotes
I left Pasadena Thursday morning of last week. The night before a most remarkable recital took place in our new auditorium. The great maestro, Arthur Rubinstein, undoubtedly the world's greatest pianist, now 88 years old, gave a recital that will never be forgotten by those who attended. Those gifted, talented fingers performed in an incredible manner such as we had never seen nor heard be fore. He donated his services, as a benefit for the International Cultural Center for Youth (ICCY) at Jerusalem. (January 23, 1975, p. 2144.)

Sunday evening, we had dinner with the Panovs -- ballet artists who appeared last fall in a masterful ballet production at the Ambassador Auditorium. They are among the very top Russian ballet artists. They have defected from Russia and are now building a home in Jerusalem. It was delightful to meet them again, with some of their company. Also with us were our VERY dear friends Ambassador and Mrs. Michael Ravid. He was formerly Consul General at Los Angeles. (August 19, 1976, p. 2222.)

12 comments:

  1. Yitzak Rabin was judged to be a rodef (Babylonian Talmudic term) by a zealot, who assassinated him for endangering Jewish lives by presuming he could give away Jewish lands to the Palestinians. It is legal according to Jewish Talmudic law to perform the extra-judicial killing of a rodef if he has been properly warned, and fails to alter his course.

    BB

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  2. It was a most terrible thing that extremist did. Rabin died for his country and Rabin's sacrifice will be remembered forever.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Even before the State of Israel was founded hwa had discussed with the Arabs. They likened influx of European Jews streaming into Palestine to the European invasion of native American lands. HWA was very understanding of that viewpoint (priding himself as being part of one of the oldest families invading the American continent. Of course the Russian persecuted Jews like Rader were extremely favorable of a Jewish homeland.

    nice to sit on the coffers of such organization.

    nck

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  4. I remember that issue. It was around 1948. HWA interviewed a Saudi diplomat and then met with a supporter of the State of Israel. But I will state that HWA's later associations in Israel did not begin until around 1968.

    I have no idea of what Rader's ancestry was like or what his political views concerning the State of Israel were like.

    As far as I can tell HWA merely sat on the coffers of WCG. But of course he was trying to make himself seem more impressive by associating himself with world leaders. His contacts with Israeli leaders was but one part of that self aggrandizing publicity campaign.

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  5. Yessir,
    I was merely pointing out that HWA's Arab contacts go far further back. It was not an incident. Even on the Atlantic cruisers they were invited for dinner by men who would eventually turn out to control the world's energy supply.

    People tend to focus on hwa because of religious nature of the corporation. I use to focus on the corporation. Then you need to learn who Stanley Rader was. They were New York jews who decended from persecuted Ukrainian Jews. This instilled in him a lifelong quest for Justice. It is my opinion that his goals in life and hwa's ego (and belief system) synchronised in a major way. You would not believe how many activities AICF sponsored that focussed on the Rule of Law, International Justice and Peace. In its critical inception phase we flew Dr Singh around the world from Japan to India and UK. To all dissidents a proof of hwa's vanity. To me it serves the purpose of a persecuted family that brilliantly to this day applies the rule of law to defend the rights of man.
    Rader had a lifetime passion for Law as the protector of man. This synchronised with the purpose of the church and hwas ego.

    People don't know what the church was doing, because they didn't know Rader, don't know anything about the Rule of Law and the development of International Relations and moreover had a firm belief in the power of Religion. But in my opinion religion was just a cloak for those who controlled the coffers.

    nck

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  6. Of course the headquarters of hwa's church in 1930 were situated in Jerusalem
    In april 1967 hwa flew into jerusalem to negotiate the world tomorrow broadcast from Jerusalem with jordanian officials. I have been branded on other websites for being a conspiracy cook because of my harping on the cia involvement with the european pirate radio stations and the one close to cuba. My claim is that the world tomorrow provided a major part of the funding for those radio stations. It is interesting to note that hwa not only negotiates the possibility to broadcast from radio jerusalem with the jordanians but what to me is far more important negotiates a larger sum of money so that the jordanians can buy expensive material from telefunken in order to increase the wattage of the station to 1 million watts. Well we all know that their Queen was American, the USA provided 80% of the funding of the Jordanian state, and that the british trained king was a fierce western ally during the cold war.

    cheers

    nck

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  7. How could we not have focussed on the "religious part of the corporation"? That was what was preached. We were also forbidden from contributing to "the world's"'charities such as United Way, or Unicef. And, God help you if you ever slipped and bought some homeless person a short dog of cheap wine to help him get through a cold winter night!

    By the standards which were set for us, HWA and Rader were either being disingenuous or secretive. We're supposed to pin postumous medals on their chests for this? Stan Rader certainly was not the only church follower with a sense of Jewish identity and social justice. I might have wanted to cloak my religious beliefs and to do good humanitarian things too, but that was forbidden of members.

    BB

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  8. BB,

    Correct about then. I was talking about the current assesment. Most assess now, the whole experience was not very religious. Why not take assessment to my conclusion that the corporation was hijacked for other purposes. No postumous medals from me. hwa received multiple medals and awards already for not mentioning US. Stan might not have been the only one, but he was the only one with full oversight of the finances and control. He only needed to synchronise hwa's goals toward his own zionist purposes. The perfect opportunity arose with the 1975 failure. He swiftly realigned the church and hwa's general message with a general message of goodwill synchronised with us foreign policy and the stated purposes of the UN. Non of it all was hidden or secretive. The first one to notice such shift would of course be GTA. So he was the one that doth protest to much.

    I am not sure I you were forbidden to do humanitarian things. The church harbored US Embassy personel and Consultants. I'm not sure. Perhaps joining the Salvation Army. But you could do good on an individual basis, as long as you didn't try to organise efforts like that. Than you pastor would feel threatened I guess

    nck

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  9. The "corporation" needed to be hijacked. It was horrible and toxic. Unfortunately, the bad things that were done in members' lives were not what got hijacked and corrected. They were exploited, and ended up funding things which they knew nothing about. HWA, while appearing to promote diplomacy amongst the powerful, gave the illusion to church insiders that he was part of the fulfilling of his own interpretaions of prophecy. And now, today, we find ourselves looking at invisible lasting effects of his diplomacy and charity, in an effort to validate his life, and the time we wasted with him.

    Stan Rader began as a paid advocate. Most of us knew nothing of his personal inner passions, or aspirations. For years, we knew he was not a church member, and his public speaking style caused members to wonder about his sexual orientation. Members and ministers alike even thought he was controlling HWA, while the reality was probably that as with everyone else, HWA was exploiting and controlling Stan in the unlikely symbiotic relationship which they shared. At one fertile period, there appears to have been a 100% loyalty of convenience between the two men, a reciprocal loyalty that no other person close to HWA had ever experienced. While it lasted, Stan Rader was arguably the most useful individual that HWA had ever encountered in the course of his entire lifetime.

    BB

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  10. Not bad, not bad at all.

    Stan and others knowing the "ways and infrastructure" of the world. A natural strategist and analytic.

    Hwa holding the key to an edifice that grew into complexity. And of course an innate talent to relate and connect with those in power. A natural builder and entrepeneur. A talent analytical people so desperately lack.

    A symbiosis, difficult to see who held the other captive. I tend to say Rader controlled the strategy of the church until 2002 or perhaps 1996 when the strategy for new market share completely folded. Tkach sr was merely a lackey again with no skills whatsoever to run a grocery shop.

    Rader got paid 200.000 dollars per annum until 2002. It's my guess he was consulted on strategy as Joe Jr presided over his funeral. It is no coincidence that the Church completely folded the month after the last installment was paid for the Auditorium lease. The Beast had to be kept alive until that moment. Another reason I speculate AICF men had advised that moment to fold.

    But that is speculation.

    nck

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  11. HWA actually threw Wayne Cole under the bus for the protection of Stan Rader, apparently without blinking. The great unwashed masses of the church accepted this because Cole, a true believer type, had advocated cooperating with the receiver, apparently working under the delusion that the church would come out of the process with a clean bill of health. They would not have.

    Armstrong, as he lay dying, is reputed to have told Tkach that some profound and fundamental changes needed to be made to the WCG. I've instinctively recognized that that was probably true, although the church would not have readily accepted massive changes from anyone with the exception of Armstrong himself. Pentecost and D&R more or less confirm that if he presented change, members accepted. Certainly, Armstrong could not have visualized any sort of successor who would continue to meet with the types of people within whose circles he had been traveling. GTA had surpassed his father in the realm of broadcasting, but most likely, assuming he had stayed in the fold, the Peter principle would have kicked in if he attempted international diplomacy.

    All in all, except if one becomes forensically microscopic, rummaging through minutiae, the very expensive alleged diplomacy of which HWA provided an illusion, would in no way survive a rudimentary cost-benefits analysis, and has had only very minor, incidental lasting impact.

    BB

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  12. As I recall, official word was that HWA had asked Tkach to put more emphasis on the Church Body. (probably assuming his self ordained mission of proclaiming the gospel was over)

    From 1986 - 1990 a breath of fresh air went to the church. Until fundamentals of the church were being tampered with. To remove even a small supporting pillar causes a crack and collapse.

    It is interesting to read the real minutiae of Israeli, US, Japanese, South African diplomacy during the cold war.

    Often tense. Hurt Israeli's turning to South Africa in a technology nuclear swap. Japanese suspicious of Israeli. Japanese industrialisation dependent on middle east energy. Comprehensive books have been produced by notable institutions.

    WCG mostly provided for large scale dinners where a remarkable number of high profile diplomats were present. Many topics were discussed but hwa of course used his time profoundly in expounding on the US deterrent of mutual assured destruction.

    Indeed it is hard to assess what those dinners accomplished in a time without internet, feeble telex and feeble international relations, on the brink of nuclear war and a generation rebuilding from wwII.

    I only know of dinners sometimes hosting hundreds of top diplomats during the seventies. I am a hundred procent sure the Israeli were thankful and also know that few professionals would admit that they had learned or met someone new at those dinners, although they took the time to attend.

    Even if 100% effective in its stated purposes of course it amounted to 2% of the day job of the professional diplomacy. (maybe 10% in the israeli case, with the us in obvious support of israel)

    I can only look back at the cold war as someting generation y or x knows little about. Glad it's over and focussing on new challenges for our 8 billion fellow citizens.

    nck

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